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Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine  2018, Vol. 19 Issue (S1): 25-30     DOI: 10.3909/ricm19S1S0001
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Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Although Identification Advances, Appreciation and Treatment Lag
Seth J. Baum1, Alan S. Brown2
1 Preventive Cardiology Inc., Boca Raton, FL
2 Division of Cardiology, Advocate Heart Institute at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital, Park Ridge, IL
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Abstract:
Familial hypercholesterolemia is one of the most common autosomal dominant inherited genetic disorders, yet it is frequently undiagnosed, leading to a markedly increased risk for cardiovascular events. Understanding the pathophysiology of the disease as well as the importance of cascade screening is critical to appropriate treatment of patients. Though the mainstay of therapy for heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia remains statins, many patients require additional therapy including ezetimibe and/or proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) antibodies to achieve adequate low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering. Access to PCSK9 inhibitors remains a significant clinical problem.
Key words:  Familial hypercholesterolemia      PCSK9 antibodies      Elevated LDL cholesterol     
Published:  20 January 2018     

Cite this article: 

Seth J. Baum, Alan S. Brown. Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Although Identification Advances, Appreciation and Treatment Lag. Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine, 2018, 19(S1): 25-30.

URL: 

https://rcm.imrpress.com/EN/10.3909/ricm19S1S0001     OR     https://rcm.imrpress.com/EN/Y2018/V19/IS1/25

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